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Consigli dal Camp (Luglio 2019)
#11

Citazione:Sometimes your characters will want to choose difficult or inconvenient things. It’s all right. Let them go ahead. Later you can decide whether that fits in with the story arc or belongs elsewhere. There is no need to maintain perfection in your writing world. In fact, I find letting the characters wander around alternate storylines very helpful. Even if you never use the material, it adds richness and depth to the world—you will know whether character A is really the sort of person to do x and y!.
Yangsze Choo
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#12

Citazione:I am a very slow writer. It took me 5 years to write my first novel, The Ghost Bride, and then 4 years for The Night Tiger. Before that I spent 8 years writing another novel about an elephant detective that didn’t go anywhere. So don’t worry about taking time to write. Everybody has their own personal rhythm.
Yangsze Choo
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#13

Citazione:Try to finish something. It doesn’t have to be a full-length novel—for years I only wrote short stories, never thinking I could manage a novel—but I do think it is good for the practice of writing (and we are always learning, with each new draft) to actually finish a piece, no matter how short it is. Completing a short story, a poem, or a play etc. is a helpful experience in writing endings and conclusions. Plus, it takes the terror/mystique away from completing projects!
Yangsze Choo
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#14

Citazione:The act of writing is to create, and sometimes it's easier to let that urge manifest itself in other ways, if you feel stuck. Draw, knit, cook, fix a bike, plant a garden, or make something with your hands—whatever renews you. It is often through doing something else that I feel rejuvenated about writing. Don’t force it. The flow will come back to you.
Yangsze Choo
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#15

Citazione:If you feel your book is dragging, perhaps this is a sign that the slow bits aren’t necessary. I think that readers can tell when the writer has lost interest in the narrative—from my own experience, those parts of the novel that I’ve particularly enjoyed writing are often the most alive and vivid. Don’t be afraid to cut. Passages often find new life in other settings. I keep all sorts of loose thoughts and sentences in a Word doc while I’m working on a book. It’s rather like having a bin of extra ideas!
Yangsze Choo
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#16

Citazione:"Write what makes you blush" is my favorite writing advice. It comes from the brilliant non-fiction writer, Lee Kofman, but it translates well into other genres. Writing horror? Write what you fear! Your book is science fiction? Write what makes your inner science fan excited! Regardless of genre, you can draw on your personal knowledge, experiences and emotions to fuel your writing. It could really make a difference to how readers engage with your work and how well they relate to your characters.
Katya de Becerra
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#17

Citazione:There’s a multitude of resources and tools for writers out there. I’ve definitely tried many. Though, I find that for me the most effective writing tools are… pen and paper! And also post-it notes! We’re all glued to our digital screens, and sometimes our brain needs a change. That’s where handwriting comes in useful. If your book hit a roadblock, step away from the computer, pick up a pen and a notepad and jot down ideas. You can also use post-it notes to storyboard. Different color post-its can signify specific plot-lines or character arcs.
Katya de Becerra
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#18

Citazione:Keep writing because someone out there is going to love your book. Someone out there needs your book. Someone out there is going to call you their “favorite writer”. That feeling you get when you hear that readers have connected with your work, that they “got it” is so special it’s totally worth all the creative agony that comes with writing, revising, querying agents, submitting to publishers and so forth. Keep writing.
Katya de Becerra
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#19

Citazione:One of the first things I do when I start a new book project is write “character sketches”. Think of these as extended bios for your protagonist and other important characters. Keep the sketches in a separate document and treat them as ever-evolving: they change, grow and get more complex as you flesh out your characters. I start each new sketch by asking questions like: What are this character’s strengths and weakness? What do they want? What scares them? These sketches can help you figure out your characters’ motivations and, hence, advance your plot.
Katya de Becerra
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#20

Citazione:Query is not only a pitching tool used to entice a literary agent to request your book, it can also be a great drafting tool. It can help you see your manuscript from a new angle. I tend to write a query for a new book when the manuscript is almost finished. Or even if I’m stuck halfway! Writing a query can reenergize your brain and answer whatever questions about your manuscript you’re still struggling to answer—including how it ends!
Katya de Becerra
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